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Loved throughout Newfoundland, this traditional baked dressing uses pure savoury to transform a bread stuffing into something extraordinarily tasty!

Traditional Newfoundland Savoury Dressing - Loved throughout Newfoundland, this traditional baked dressing uses pure savoury to transform a bread stuffing into something extraordinarily tasty!#newfoundland #recipes #stuffing #dressing #traditional

Newfoundland has a dried herb that’s pretty much all its own. It’s called savoury. That’s it – nothing complicated. It’s a dried herb that is grown and harvested in some parts of Newfoundland and Labrador. It’s not commonly found in other parts of North America.

The dried herb has a very distinctive taste and aroma. I grew up with it – my mom would never roast a turkey without savoury. That would be blasphemy! It’s also used in soups, stews, stuffed squid, and even baked into savoury tea biscuits at times.

Even though I would personally use nothing but Mt. Scio Farm brand, you can certainly use any dried savoury you prefer. Most Newfoundlanders will tell you – argue with you – that any other savoury is not the real thing. Frankly, being a Newfie, I’d have to agree, but summer savoury is summer savoury; it’s that simple.

If you really want your dressing to be authentic, you can order Newfoundland Savoury online. Just like every other Newfoundlander that loves to bake and cook, I always have a pouch or two on hand just in case.

Isn’t dressing and stuffing the same?

In essence, yes, but there is a difference depending on who you ask. This is how I like to differentiate between the two. Even though this recipe can be prepared dry like the version you see in the photos, you can also prepare it stuffed into a turkey or a chicken.

Loved throughout Newfoundland, this traditional baked dressing uses pure savoury to transform a bread stuffing into something extraordinarily tasty!#newfoundland #recipes #stuffing #dressing #traditional

In my head, I keep the two separate this way – a dry, baked version is called dressing. If it’s stuffed into a turkey or chicken, then it’s called stuffing! I like to call it dressing when it’s in dry form, because I usually use it as an ingredient to “dress” another dish. But, I’ll get to that shortly.

For the most part, in Newfoundland, if you say dressing or if you say stuffing, most people are going to know exactly what you’re talking about. Whether it’s dry or wet, the flavour is the same, so dressing and stuffing can work interchangeably.

I prefer a wetter dressing!

To be honest, I don’t know if I can decide between the two in terms of which one I like best, because they both have a purpose and a function.

Loved throughout Newfoundland, this traditional baked dressing uses pure savoury to transform a bread stuffing into something extraordinarily tasty!#newfoundland #recipes #stuffing #dressing #traditional

A dry dressing can be used in many ways, whereas I feel that a wetter dressing – one that has been baked in a turkey – is more limited. To me, a wet dressing is best served with hot turkey, gravy, mashed potatoes, carrots, etc. It’s a typical hot dinner, if you will.

The dry version can be used in more ways. Unlike the wet version, which will cool down and eventually become gummy, the dry version can be cooled and stored into freezer-safe containers and frozen for later use. I always make a double batch and freeze at least half for later.

What can I do with all of this dressing?

I’m so glad you asked! Dressing can be used for just about anything, if you ask me! There are two very popular ways to serve it in Newfoundland, and that’s with either a Jigg’s Dinner or Cold Plates.

Loved throughout Newfoundland, this traditional baked dressing uses pure savoury to transform a bread stuffing into something extraordinarily tasty!#newfoundland #recipes #stuffing #dressing #traditional

It’s also served in a dish that is simply called Fries, Dressing, & Gravy. And it’s just that! Hot French fries, topped with a good helping of dressing, and then flooded in hot gravy. It’s delicious! Some people refer to it as a Mess, but I think a Mess should have deep fried hot dog wieners and cheese as well!

You can serve dressing as a side to many dishes. It’s so good with roasted chicken and it’s a great pairing to baked fish. In fact, use it as a crumb topping to your favourite seafood gratin!

If you will stay with me for just one more minute, I’ll tell you one of my favourite ways to use up leftover dressing. I like to add a good layer of it to a deli sandwich. I spoon it right on top of the mayonnaise so that it sticks well. Then, pile on the deli meat and your favourite toppings – delicious!

Conclusion:

In our home, every holiday comes with the taste and aroma of a new batch of this dressing. I will make it at Easter, Thanksgiving, and Christmas. And, because I make a double batch, I can freeze it for up to 3 months, so I always have some on hand for when the mood hits.

As a last note, this recipe does make a large amount. If you would prefer, you can cut the recipe back by half or even a quarter by adjusting the recipe accordingly. This is one recipe that is very forgiving!

If you loved this recipe, here are some others that might interest you as well:

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5 from 4 votes

Traditional Newfoundland Savoury Dressing

Loved throughout Newfoundland, this traditional baked dressing uses pure savoury to transform a bread stuffing into something extraordinarily tasty!
Course Side Dish
Cuisine Newfoundland
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour 30 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 50 minutes
Servings 12 servings
Calories 241kcal
Author Lord Byron’s Kitchen

Ingredients

  • 675 grams white bread (one large loaf white Wonder Bread is best)
  • 1 large white onion, peeled and finely diced
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1/2 cup butter, melted and cooled
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 tablespoons dried savoury
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
  • In a skillet, saute the onions with the olive oil until lightly browned. Remove from heat and allow to cool.
  • Melt butter and set aside to cool.
  • Add two or three slices of bread to a food processor and pulse until bread is broken down into crumbs (about the size of rice).
  • Place all of the grated bread into a large bowl. Add the sugar, savoury, salt, and ground black pepper. Toss well to combine.
  • Add in the onions and pour in the melted butter. Use a spatula to toss until the butter and onions have been well incorporated into the bread mixture.
  • Transfer to a baking dish. Bake for 90 minutes or until the bread has browned and has dried a little. It's important to mix the bread thoroughly every 20 minutes during the cooking time.
  • Remove from oven and serve immediately or allow to cool completely if serving as a cold side.

Notes

If you prefer, you can buy stuffing bread, but this recipe works best if you take the time to prepare the bread yourself.

Nutrition

Calories: 241kcal | Carbohydrates: 31g | Protein: 5g | Fat: 11g | Saturated Fat: 5g | Cholesterol: 20mg | Sodium: 538mg | Potassium: 86mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 5g | Vitamin A: 253IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 159mg | Iron: 2mg

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Loved throughout Newfoundland, this traditional baked dressing uses pure savoury to transform a bread stuffing into something extraordinarily tasty!#newfoundland #recipes #stuffing #dressing #traditional

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This Post Has 8 Comments

  1. We had a close friend in New York whose mum was from Newfoundland, and who spent summers there with her grandparents as a child. I can't think of savoury without thinking of her... It "must be" in beef stew, it has definitely improved my breakfast sausage, and I guess I'll have to try it in stuffing, now! Wonderful flavor.
  2. This was really, really good. I was unfortunately raised with boxed stuffing and have been experimenting with homemade versions and this was a great way to use some homemade bread. I had to hunt down the savoury but I'm glad I did, we'll be trying it over fries with gravy soon!
  3. I grew up with this stuffing and still make it. Our version is a bit different as we've never used olive oil. I live it the states now and finding savory is a bit of a challenge so I order it in bottles from Newfoundland. Nothing like it.
    1. Same here, Tina. I didn't grow up with olive oil either. Our onions were fried in butter. :)

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